NY Times - How to Be More Resilient

NY Times - How to Be More Resilient

We all want to be more resilient - better able to recover, or bounce back, from adversity. This New York Times article shares the key findings from a recent study and underscores the importance of some tried and true practices - mindfulness, social support systems, and exercise.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/15/opinion/sunday/stress-anxiety-depression-research.html

Mindfulness at Work - NY Times article

Mindfulness at Work - NY Times article

Most people are afraid of mindfulness, seeing it as an impossible feat where one must sit in silence for extended periods of time. This simple and straightforward NY Times article about Mindfulness debunks that myth and offers a basic mindfulness exercise that anyone can do!

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/well/be-more-mindful-at-work

How to Help Teenagers Embrace Stress - The New York Times

How to Help Teenagers Embrace Stress - The New York Times

As the new school year begins across the country, students (and parents) will inevitably begin to feel the stress of academic demands. This NY Times article, by psychologist Lisa Damour, reminds us that growth cannot occur without approaching life’s challenges, whether in school or in everyday life.

“…we should appreciate that healthy stress is inevitable when we operate at the edge of our abilities. Stretching beyond familiar limits doesn’t always feel good, but growing and learning — the keys to school and much of life — can’t happen any other way.”

Do Childhood Attachment Patterns Inform Our Relationship With Food?

Do Childhood Attachment Patterns Inform Our Relationship With Food?

My favorite class in graduate school at UCLA was focused on Attachment Theory; the theory that one's early relationship (or attachment stye) with a primary caregiver has a profound influence on how one relates to themselves and others in life. I draw from this theory in my practice with all my clients, as I truly believe in this theory.

Fellow Los Angeles psychotherapist, Traci Bank Cohen, has a great article on GOOP that explains the correlation between attachment styles and eating disorders. 

To my clients - notice the "tips" she gives...sound familiar?

To everyone - you can resolve your attachment issues and lead a meaningful, rewarding life. Do not give up!

New York Times - The case for having a hobby

New York Times - The case for having a hobby

The initial request of almost all of my clients is to "be happy". I believe in order to be happy, one must do what makes them happy! This is the tricky part, as many do not know or do not have the time to do something they enjoy. This is where the term "hobby" comes into play.

As this New York Times article eloquently states, "For many of us, expectations of an “always-on” working life have made hobbies a thing of the past, relegated to mere memories of what we used to do in our free time." 

For many, engaging in a hobby seems like a waste of time, seen as it is not tied to work or does not seem productive. These are two of the key reasons why leisurely activities are so important in our overall well-being. The article also provides stats on how hobbies actually do make you more productive with work -  lowering blood pressure and lowering levels of depression and stress. 

What's your hobby?

Link to article: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/10/smarter-living/the-case-for-hobbies-ideas.html

 

Reducing the stigma associated with mental health issues

Reducing the stigma associated with mental health issues

Let’s remove the shame and stigma associated with mental health disorders. In this week's People Magazine, Mariah Carey shares her story, proving that one can struggle with mental health, substance use and/or eating disorders AND be worthy of living a full life. We need to open the dialogue and take away the fear…we can start by talking about it!

NY Times article - To Raise Resilient Kids, Be a Resilient Parent

NY Times article - To Raise Resilient Kids, Be a Resilient Parent

This helpful article in the NY Times highlights a major point I see in my practice, whether it be the young adult who has been overly protected in life thus never experiencing adverse emotions, or the parent who is so nurturing that they fear for any emotional discomfort for their child.

Part of life is to experience the good and the bad; one cannot feel happiness without feeling sadness. 

Being a parent is the most challenging job and I understand the initial instinct for many is to protect their child from any discomfort. As shared in the article, Take a Breath and Let Emotions Happen. You are doing the best you can. Allowing your child to experience discomfort is part of being a good parent; validate, acknowledge the emotions and allow your child to build their own sense of worth by getting through an adverse experience. By being resilient yourself you are raising a child to become resilient.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/well/family/to-raise-resilient-kids-be-a-resilient-parent.html?smprod=nytcore-ipad&smid=nytcore-ipad-share

 

You can have anxiety AND be happy, successful and have a life!

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You can have anxiety AND be happy, successful and have a life!

I love, love, LOVE when people share about their experiences living with anxiety and still being able to enjoy their lives. Thank you @TodayShow and @CarsonDaly for including this important segment in today’s show. He shares that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, progressive muscle relaxation and exercise work to help manage his anxiety - all tools I practice with my clients (amongst others!). By working with a therapist, Mr. Daly shares that he has learned to embrace who he is and has the tools to work through those periods of anxiety.

"I may be a little anxious, but I know I'm going to be okay." Amen to that, Carson.

https://www.today.com/health/carson-daly-describes-tools-he-uses-cope-his-anxiety-disorder-t124737

 

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Three great articles to read in this week's issue of Time magazine

Three great articles to read in this week's issue of Time magazine

Time magazine’s February 12, 2018 issue includes a few articles that are worth reading.

A short article about Parenting by Donald L. Rosenstein and Justin M. Yopp highlights Donald Winiccott’s concept of the “good enough” mother, and how it applies to fathers as well. As a clinician, I find myself educating parents on this concept – and not only for parents who have young children, but ones who have adult children and feel guilt over what more they could or should have done.

Photographer, daughter, and mental illness advocate Melissa Spitz (@spitz_melissa) shares her life story in pictures. Her mother has been struggling with severe mental health issues since Melissa was a young age, and through her photographs and stories, we learn just how hard and one-sided our society can be on individuals and the loved ones of those living with severe mental health issues.

Finally, just in time for the Olympics, skiing champion Mikaela Shiffrin (@mikaelashiffrin) opens up about her crippling anxiety and shares that with the help of a sport psychologist, she has been able to shift her thinking before races. As a former competitive figure skater (for close to two decades of my life!) who also struggled with anxiety, I use my experience to help athletes of all ages worth through their performance anxiety. I appreciate Mikaela’s vulnerability in opening up. As I always preach, in order to reduce the stigma, we must be open and talk about it!

#timemagazine #mikaelashiffrin #2018olympics #goodenoughparent #reducethestigma #mentalhealthawareness

Happy 2018! Simple words to guide you in the new year

Happy 2018! Simple words to guide you in the new year

Happy New Year! Instead of loading yourself with unrealistic resolutions in 2018, why not try to incorporate some fun and simple changes?! Many of my favorite articles come from the Sunday edition of the New York Times - this one is no exception.

 

Let's get the conversation started - 1 in 5 American children are struggling with a mental health disorder

Let's get the conversation started - 1 in 5 American children are struggling with a mental health disorder

It is no secret and there is nothing wrong with you (if you are an adolescent) or you (if you are a parent!). It's a part of life and many children struggle with mental health disorders. If you are a parent, please do not minimize how your child is feeling. If you are an adolescent, please reach out to an adult to seek support!

//www.today.com/video/kids-and-anxiety-how-one-family-is-working-to-erase-the-stigma-1114639427590

 

NYTimes Article- Why Trying New Things Is So Hard to Do

NYTimes Article- Why Trying New Things Is So Hard to Do

Thought-provoking article written by Harvard economics professor, Sendhil Mullainathan. "Experimentation is an act of humility, an acknowledgment that there is simply no way of knowing without trying something different."